Holy Week       Service Customaries will be updated prior to Holy Week

Palm Sunday

 

Holy Week begins with Palm Sunday, which may also be referred as Passion Sunday. Traditionally, Palm Sunday commemorates the triumphal entry into Jerusalem described in all four of the Gospel accounts. Jesus's entry into Jerusalem was noted by the crowds present who shouted praises and waved palm branches. 

 

Maundy

Thursday

 

Maundy Thursday (also known as Holy Thursday) commemorates the Last Supper, where Christ lays out the model for the Eucharist or Holy Communion. During the meal, Jesus predicted the events that would immediately follow, including his betrayal, the Denial of Peter, and his death and resurrection. Events of the last supper play varying roles in commemoration liturgies depending on the denomination. The Mass of the Lord's Supper commemorates the Last Supper of Jesus with his Twelve Apostles, "the institution of the Eucharist, the institution of the priesthood, and the commandment of brotherly love that Jesus gave after washing the feet of his disciples.

 

 

Prayer Vigil

 

The event continues to an all-night Prayer Vigil commemorating Jesus asking Peter, James and John to join him in prayer in the Garden of Gethsemene, just shortly before his arrest by the Religious rulers, known as the Sanhedrin. "Could you not stay awake for one hour and pray?" is at the heart of a volunteer rotation of Christians who sign up for this event.

 

Good Friday

 

Good Friday commemorates the crucifixion of Jesus and his subsequent death. Commemorations are often solemn and mournful, whereas the Stations of the Cross is prominently performed. They also may be a self-guided time of reflection and veneration or as a procession of statues or images of the stations. The evening liturgical celebration on Holy Thursday begins the first of the three days of the Easter Triduum, which continues in an atmosphere of liturgical mourning throughout the next day in spite of the name "Good" given in English to this Friday.

Easter 

 

Easter Day, which immediately follows Holy Week and begins with the Easter Vigil (typically sunset on Saturday), is the great feast day and apogee of the Christian liturgical year: on this day, from sunset to the sunrise on Easter Sunday, the Resurrection of Jesus Christ is celebrated. It is the first day of the new season of the Great Fifty Days, or Eastertide, which runs from Easter Day to Pentecost Sunday. The Resurrection of Christ on Easter Day is the main reason why Christians keep every Sunday as the primary day of religious observance.